Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease that causes your own body's immune system to attack the tissue lining of the joints. An inflammatory disease of the joints that sometimes can disable the patient. This can lead to inflammation of the joints, muscles, affecting the surrounding world. As the result of inflammation, this causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in various joints of the body.

In rheumatoid arthritis, treatment, doctors generally prefer to use drugs. However, you have to face the potential side effects, especially if they depend too much to the relief of pain. You can consider natural treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. She almost does not cause side effects. You can use several methods to deal with pain more effectively.

A nutrient diet can help you manage the painful condition of arthritis. However, some foods can worsen the arthritic condition. For example, eating a lot of red meat may promote the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritic many victims can not afford gluten, gliadin, and dairy goods. Medical documents show that a fast two weeks with vegetable broth can help reduce the signs of arthritis. Medical documents showing that the diet is abundant in cold-water fish can reduce inflammation. So take in large amounts of fruits and vegetables, and foods that are low in arachidonic acid (animal fat) for pain relief.

Herbs can help reduce the painful condition due to rheumatoid arthritis. Despite the fact that the herbs as food, have demonstrated its effectiveness as an aid in treating rheumatoid arthritis. Valerian is a botanical medicinal plant that has a strong possibility that they may heal muscle and joint pain. Ginger, curcumin, and boswellia are often used as natural treatments for rheumatoid arthritis. In Ayurveda, its use is essential to reduce inflammation. If you decide to use botanical supplements, always at the request of lawyers from your doctor.

Dietary supplements such as fish oil can naturally treat rheumatoid arthritis. Fish oil has high amounts of two omega-3: EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). These omega fatty acids may produce compounds that reduce the inflammatory condition. However, they can slow the progression of the disease.

Glucosamine is a kind of amino sugar, the fluid that surrounds the joints. Doctors believe it may help in the development and repair cartilage. Cartilage is an elastic tissue, but strong clothes that the ends of bones. This will not allow the bones to rub against each other, and absorbs the impact force… Chondroitin sulfate is a compound found in cartilage around the joints. It is part of a larger protein molecule (proteoglycan). It is responsible for the elasticity of cartilage. Glucosamine encourage and stimulate the development and reconstruction of the articular cartilage, while chondroitin sulfate prevents other body enzymes to slow the building blocks of joint cartilage.

Despite the fact that you can opt for natural treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, they should complement and not replace conventional care. Rheumatoid arthritis is not easy to treat. Even if you opt for natural methods, you should maintain regular visits to a rheumatologist to attend to serious complications.

About the author:

Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/health-fitness-articles/diseases-articles/rheumatoid-arthritis-stiffness-loss-function-36305.html


rheumatoid arthritis

I Have Arthritis That Affects A Lot Of My Joints Could It Be Rheumatoid Arthritis And How Will The Doctor Know?

There are more than 100 different kinds of arthritis. Most of them involve inflammation. When a patient goes to a rheumatologist to get a diagnosis, there is a process of elimination in order to arrive at the proper diagnosis. This process of elimination is called “differential diagnosis.”

Differential diagnosis can be a difficult undertaking because so many forms of arthritis, particularly inflammatory forms of arthritis look alike. The following is a list of types of inflammatory arthritis that can be seen and must be considered when evaluating a patient with inflammatory symptoms of arthritis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

RA is an chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory disease, that may affect any joint in the body but preferentially attacks the peripheral joints (fingers, wrists, elbows, shoulders, hips, knees, ankles, and feet. It can also affect non-joint organ systems such as the lung, eye, skin, and cardiovascular system. The onset of RA may be insidious-slow- with nonspecific symptoms, including fatigue, malaise, loss of appetite, low-grade fever, weight loss, and vague aches and pains, or it may have an abrupt onset with inflammation involving multiple joints. The joint symptoms usually occur bilaterally and are symmetric. Damage to joints- called “erosions” can be seen with magnetic resonance imaging early on or by x-ray later in the course of disease. Approximately 80% of patients with RA will have elevated levels of rheumatoid factor (RF) or anti-CCP antibodies.

Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA)

JRA describes a group of arthritic conditions that occur in children under the age of 16. Three forms of JRA exist, including oligoarticular (1-4 joints), polyarticular (> 4 joints), and systemic-onset or Still’s disease. The latter is associated with significant internal organ involvement and may also present with fever and rash in addition to joint disease. Polyarticular JRA is considered to be the type that is most similar to adult RA, and is responsible for approximately 30% of cases of JRA. Most children with polyarticular JRA are negative for RF and their prognosis is usually good. Roughly, 20% of polyarticular JRA patients will have elevated RF, and these patients appear to be at more risk for chronic, progressive joint destruction and damage. Uveitis- an inflammatory condition of the eye- is a common finding in oligoarticular JRA, especially in patients who are antinuclear antibody (ANA) positive. The dangerous feature of uveitis is that it can cause relatively few symptoms so careful screening is recommended in order to avoid blindness.

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

SLE is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder that can involve the skin, joints, kidneys, brain, and blood vessel walls. At least 4 of the following symptoms which have been formulated by the American College of Rheumatology are generally present for a diagnosis to be made:

• Red, butterfly-shaped rash on the face, affecting the cheeks;

• Typical skin rash on other parts of the body;

• Sensitivity to sunlight;

• Mouth sores;

• Joint inflammation (arthritis);

• Fluid around the lungs, heart, or other organs;

• Kidney dysfunction;

• Low white blood cell count, low red blood cell count due to hemolytic anemia, or low platelet count;

• Nerve or brain dysfunction;

• Positive results of a blood test for ANA; and

• Positive results of a blood test for antibodies to double-stranded DNA or other antibodies including anti-Smith antibodies or antiphospholipid antibodies.

Patients with lupus can have significant inflammatory arthritis. That is why lupus can be difficult to distinguish from RA, especially if other signs and symptoms of lupus are minimal.

Inflammatory Muscle Disease

Polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) are types of inflammatory muscle disease. These conditions typically present with bilateral (both sides) large muscle weakness. In the case of DM, rash can be a presenting sign. Diagnosis consists of four major features, including elevation of creatine kinase (CPK), signs and symptoms such as muscle weakness, elevated muscle enzymes (creatine kinase, aldolase), electromyograph (EMG) abnormalities, and a positive muscle biopsy. Often, laboratory test abnormalities can be seen including the presence of autoantibodies such antinuclear antibody (ANA), and the myositis-associated antibodies.

In both PM and DM, inflammatory arthritis can be present and can look like RA — including lung involvement. In RA, however, unless an overlap syndrome – ie., a patient having both RA as well as muscle disease) is present, muscle function should be normal. Also, in PM and DM, erosive joint disease is unlikely. RF and anti-CCP antibodies are typically elevated in RA and not PM or DM.

Spondyloarthropathies (SA)

A group of arthritic conditions called the spondyloarthropathies which include psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and enteropathic arthritis are a category of disease that cause inflammation throughout the entire body, particularly in parts of the spine and at other joints where tendons attach to bones. They also can cause pain and stiffness in the neck, upper and lower back, tendonitis, bursitis, heel pain, and fatigue. They are often called seronegative arthritis. The term ‘seronegative’ means that tests for lab markers such as rheumatoid factor are negative. Symptoms of adult SA include:

• Back and/or joint pain;
• Morning stiffness;
• Tenderness near bones;
• Sores on the skin;
• Inflammation of the joints on both sides of the body;
• Skin or mouth ulcers;
• Rash on the bottom of the feet; and
• Eye inflammation.

In some cases of SA, peripheral arthritis resembling RA can be present. Careful history and physical examination can usually distinguish between these syndromes, especially if an obvious disease that is aggravating inflammation is present (psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease). In addition, since RA rarely affects the end joints of the fingers (DIP joints), if these joints are involved from inflammatory arthritis, the diagnosis of an SA is favored. Usually, RF and anti-CCP antibodies are negative in SA, although in some cases of psoriatic arthritis there may be elevations of RF and anti-CCP antibodies.

Crystal Associated Arthritis

Monosodium Urate Disease (Gout)

Gout is due to deposition of monosodium urate crystals in a joint. Gouty arthritis is typically sudden in onset, very painful, with signs of significant inflammation on exam (red, warm, swollen joints). Gout can affect almost any joint in the body, but typically affects “cooler” regions including the toes, feet, ankles, knees, and hands. Diagnosis is made by withdrawing fluid from a joint and examining the fluid under a polarizing microscope. Patients may also have elevated serum levels of uric acid.

In most cases, gout is an acute disease that affects one joint and is easily distinguished from RA. However, in rare cases, chronic erosive inflammation can develop and affect multiple joints. And, in cases where tophi (deposits of uric acid under the skin) are present, it can be difficult to distinguish from erosive RA. However, crystal analysis of joints or tophi and blood tests should be helpful in distinguishing gout from RA.

Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease (CPPD; Pseudogout)

CPPD disease is caused by deposits of calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals in a joint. The body’s reaction to these crystals, leads to significant inflammation. Diagnosis includes:

• Detailed medical history and physical exam;
• Withdrawing fluid from a joint using a needle;
• Joint x-rays to show crystals deposited on the cartilage (chondrocalcinosis);
• Blood tests to rule out other diseases (e.g., RA or osteoarthritis).

In most cases, CPPD arthritis presents with acute arthritis affecting one or more joints. However, in some cases, CPPD disease can present with chronic symmetric multiple joint erosive arthritis similar to RA. RA and CPPD disease can usually be distinguished by joint fluid examination demonstrating calcium pyrophosphate crystals, and by blood tests, including RF and anti-CCP antibodies, which should be negative in CCPD arthritis.

Sarcoid Arthritis

Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory type of arthritis. The majority of patients with this disease have lung disease, with eye and skin disease being the next most frequent signs of disease. In most cases, the diagnosis of sarcoidosis can be made on clinical and x-ray presentation alone. Patients will have acute arthritis, painful nodules under the skin on the shins (erythema nodosum), and a chest x-ray showing enlargement of lymph niodes. In some cases, the demonstration of a specific type of inflammation change, called a noncaseating granuloma on tissue biopsy, is necessary for definitive diagnosis.

Arthritis can be present in approximately 15% of patients with sarcoidosis, and in rare cases can be the only sign of disease. In acute sarcoid arthritis, joint disease is usually rapid in onset, symmetric, involving the ankle joints. The knees, wrists, and small joints of the hands can be involved. In most cases of acute disease, lung and skin disease are also present. Chronic sarcoid arthritis typically involves one or maybe a few joints and due to its often erosive nature can be difficult to distinguish from RA.

Polymyalgia Rheumatica (PMR) / Temporal Arthritis

PMR is a form of arthritis that leads to inflammation of tendons, muscles, ligaments, and tissues around the joints. It is characterized by large muscle (shoulders, hips, thighs, neck) pain, aching, morning stiffness, fatigue, and in some cases, fever. It can be associated with temporal arthritis/giant-cell arthritis (TA/GCA) which is a related but more serious condition in which inflammation of large blood vessels can lead to complications such as blindness, aneurysms and cramping pain in the arms or legs (limb claudication) due to inflammation and narrowing of the large blood vessels in the chest and extremities. PMR is diagnosed when the clinical picture is accompanied by elevated markers of inflammation (ESR and/or CRP). If temporal arthritis is suspected (headache, vision changes, limb claudication), biopsy of a temporal artery may be necessary to make the diagnosis.

PMR and TA/GCA can present with symmetric inflammatory arthritis similar to RA. These diseases can usually be distinguished by blood tests. In addition, headaches, acute vision changes, and large muscle pain are uncommon in RA, and if these are present, PMR and/or TA/GCA should be considered.

Infectious Arthritis

Many infections can present with arthritis either due to direct joint infection or due to autoimmune joint inflammation. In most cases, infections lead to acute single joint arthritis; however, in some cases, chronic arthritis affecting a few or many joints can be present. Because missed infections can lead to significant complications, it is crucial to have a high index of suspicion for infection in any patient presenting with acute or chronic arthritis.

Lyme disease

Lyme disease is an infection due to a type of bacteria called a spirochete. The disease is manifested by a skin rash, swollen joints and flu-like symptoms, caused from the bite of an infected tick. Symptoms may include:

• A skin rash, often resembling a bulls-eye (target lesion);
• Fever;
• Headache;
• Muscle pain;
• Stiff neck; and
• Swelling of knees and other large joints.

The diagnosis of Lyme disease is typically made by blood testing. If, however, chronic single joint arthritis develops, joint fluid analysis or joint tissue biopsy may be necessary for diagnosis. Lyme arthritis can usually be distinguished from RA by clinical presentation and blood tests.

Acute rheumatic fever (ARF)

Acute rheumatic fever is an inflammatory disease that may develop after an infection with the Streptococcus bacteria (strep throat or scarlet fever). The disease can affect the heart, joints, skin, and brain. Symptoms include:

• Fever;
• Joint pain;
• Arthritis (mainly in the knees, elbows, ankles, and wrists);
• Joint swelling; redness or warmth;
• Abdominal pain;
• Skin rash
• Skin nodules;
• A peculiar movement disorder (Sydenham’s chorea)
• Nosebleeds;
• Heart problems, which can be asymptomatic.

The diagnosis of ARF is made by clinical assessment and blood testing for antibodies against streptococcal proteins. ARF and RA can have similar clinical features including arthritis and nodules. However, ARF can usually be distinguished from RA by clinical presentation. Rash and migratory arthritis are unusual in RA. The use of blood tests is also helpful.

Viral arthritis (hepatitis B and C, parvovirus, EBV, HIV)

Arthritis may be a symptom of many viral illnesses. This makes viral infections a great masquerader. The duration is usually short, and it usually disappears on its own without any lasting effects. Clinical features in adults:

• Joint symptoms occur in up to 60%. These can be symmetric and affect the small joints of the hands, wrists, and ankles as well as the knees. Morning stiffness is also present.

• Parvovirus B19 is a very common viral infection that looks like RA.

• Diagnosis of viral arthritis is made by serologic testing. A high percentage of patients with hepatitis C may have elevated titers of RF. Therefore, RF testing is not helpful in distinguishing between hepatitis C infection and RA. However, in these situations, testing for anti-CCP can be helpful as anti-CCP antibodies have not been shown to be significantly elevated in isolated hepatitis C infections.

So as you can see… “it ain’t easy…”


Lupus Skin Rash Picture

There are more than 100 different kinds of arthritis. Most of them involve inflammation. When a patient goes to a rheumatologist to get a diagnosis, there is a process of elimination in order to arrive at the proper diagnosis. This process of elimination is called “differential diagnosis.”

Differential diagnosis can be a difficult undertaking because so many forms of arthritis, particularly inflammatory forms of arthritis look alike. The following is a list of types of inflammatory arthritis that can be seen and must be considered when evaluating a patient with inflammatory symptoms of arthritis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

RA is an chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory disease, that may affect any joint in the body but preferentially attacks the peripheral joints (fingers, wrists, elbows, shoulders, hips, knees, ankles, and feet. It can also affect non-joint organ systems such as the lung, eye, skin, and cardiovascular system. The onset of RA may be insidious-slow- with nonspecific symptoms, including fatigue, malaise, loss of appetite, low-grade fever, weight loss, and vague aches and pains, or it may have an abrupt onset with inflammation involving multiple joints. The joint symptoms usually occur bilaterally and are symmetric. Damage to joints- called “erosions” can be seen with magnetic resonance imaging early on or by x-ray later in the course of disease. Approximately 80% of patients with RA will have elevated levels of rheumatoid factor (RF) or anti-CCP antibodies.

Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA)

JRA describes a group of arthritic conditions that occur in children under the age of 16. Three forms of JRA exist, including oligoarticular (1-4 joints), polyarticular (> 4 joints), and systemic-onset or Still’s disease. The latter is associated with significant internal organ involvement and may also present with fever and rash in addition to joint disease. Polyarticular JRA is considered to be the type that is most similar to adult RA, and is responsible for approximately 30% of cases of JRA. Most children with polyarticular JRA are negative for RF and their prognosis is usually good. Roughly, 20% of polyarticular JRA patients will have elevated RF, and these patients appear to be at more risk for chronic, progressive joint destruction and damage. Uveitis- an inflammatory condition of the eye- is a common finding in oligoarticular JRA, especially in patients who are antinuclear antibody (ANA) positive. The dangerous feature of uveitis is that it can cause relatively few symptoms so careful screening is recommended in order to avoid blindness.

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

SLE is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder that can involve the skin, joints, kidneys, brain, and blood vessel walls. At least 4 of the following symptoms which have been formulated by the American College of Rheumatology are generally present for a diagnosis to be made:

• Red, butterfly-shaped rash on the face, affecting the cheeks;

• Typical skin rash on other parts of the body;

• Sensitivity to sunlight;

• Mouth sores;

• Joint inflammation (arthritis);

• Fluid around the lungs, heart, or other organs;

• Kidney dysfunction;

• Low white blood cell count, low red blood cell count due to hemolytic anemia, or low platelet count;

• Nerve or brain dysfunction;

• Positive results of a blood test for ANA; and

• Positive results of a blood test for antibodies to double-stranded DNA or other antibodies including anti-Smith antibodies or antiphospholipid antibodies.

Patients with lupus can have significant inflammatory arthritis. That is why lupus can be difficult to distinguish from RA, especially if other signs and symptoms of lupus are minimal.

Inflammatory Muscle Disease

Polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) are types of inflammatory muscle disease. These conditions typically present with bilateral (both sides) large muscle weakness. In the case of DM, rash can be a presenting sign. Diagnosis consists of four major features, including elevation of creatine kinase (CPK), signs and symptoms such as muscle weakness, elevated muscle enzymes (creatine kinase, aldolase), electromyograph (EMG) abnormalities, and a positive muscle biopsy. Often, laboratory test abnormalities can be seen including the presence of autoantibodies such antinuclear antibody (ANA), and the myositis-associated antibodies.

In both PM and DM, inflammatory arthritis can be present and can look like RA — including lung involvement. In RA, however, unless an overlap syndrome – ie., a patient having both RA as well as muscle disease) is present, muscle function should be normal. Also, in PM and DM, erosive joint disease is unlikely. RF and anti-CCP antibodies are typically elevated in RA and not PM or DM.

Spondyloarthropathies (SA)

A group of arthritic conditions called the spondyloarthropathies which include psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and enteropathic arthritis are a category of disease that cause inflammation throughout the entire body, particularly in parts of the spine and at other joints where tendons attach to bones. They also can cause pain and stiffness in the neck, upper and lower back, tendonitis, bursitis, heel pain, and fatigue. They are often called seronegative arthritis. The term ‘seronegative’ means that tests for lab markers such as rheumatoid factor are negative. Symptoms of adult SA include:

• Back and/or joint pain;

• Morning stiffness;

• Tenderness near bones;

• Sores on the skin;

• Inflammation of the joints on both sides of the body;

• Skin or mouth ulcers;

• Rash on the bottom of the feet; and

• Eye inflammation.

In some cases of SA, peripheral arthritis resembling RA can be present. Careful history and physical examination can usually distinguish between these syndromes, especially if an obvious disease that is aggravating inflammation is present (psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease). In addition, since RA rarely affects the end joints of the fingers (DIP joints), if these joints are involved from inflammatory arthritis, the diagnosis of an SA is favored. Usually, RF and anti-CCP antibodies are negative in SA, although in some cases of psoriatic arthritis there may be elevations of RF and anti-CCP antibodies.

Crystal Associated Arthritis

Monosodium Urate Disease (Gout)

Gout is due to deposition of monosodium urate crystals in a joint. Gouty arthritis is typically sudden in onset, very painful, with signs of significant inflammation on exam (red, warm, swollen joints). Gout can affect almost any joint in the body, but typically affects “cooler” regions including the toes, feet, ankles, knees, and hands. Diagnosis is made by withdrawing fluid from a joint and examining the fluid under a polarizing microscope. Patients may also have elevated serum levels of uric acid.

In most cases, gout is an acute disease that affects one joint and is easily distinguished from RA. However, in rare cases, chronic erosive inflammation can develop and affect multiple joints. And, in cases where tophi (deposits of uric acid under the skin) are present, it can be difficult to distinguish from erosive RA. However, crystal analysis of joints or tophi and blood tests should be helpful in distinguishing gout from RA.

Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease (CPPD; Pseudogout)

CPPD disease is caused by deposits of calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals in a joint. The body’s reaction to these crystals, leads to significant inflammation. Diagnosis includes:

• Detailed medical history and physical exam;

• Withdrawing fluid from a joint using a needle;

• Joint x-rays to show crystals deposited on the cartilage (chondrocalcinosis);

• Blood tests to rule out other diseases (e.g., RA or osteoarthritis).

In most cases, CPPD arthritis presents with acute arthritis affecting one or more joints. However, in some cases, CPPD disease can present with chronic symmetric multiple joint erosive arthritis similar to RA. RA and CPPD disease can usually be distinguished by joint fluid examination demonstrating calcium pyrophosphate crystals, and by blood tests, including RF and anti-CCP antibodies, which should be negative in CCPD arthritis.

Sarcoid Arthritis

Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory type of arthritis. The majority of patients with this disease have lung disease, with eye and skin disease being the next most frequent signs of disease. In most cases, the diagnosis of sarcoidosis can be made on clinical and x-ray presentation alone. Patients will have acute arthritis, painful nodules under the skin on the shins (erythema nodosum), and a chest x-ray showing enlargement of lymph niodes. In some cases, the demonstration of a specific type of inflammation change, called a noncaseating granuloma on tissue biopsy, is necessary for definitive diagnosis.

Arthritis can be present in approximately 15% of patients with sarcoidosis, and in rare cases can be the only sign of disease. In acute sarcoid arthritis, joint disease is usually rapid in onset, symmetric, involving the ankle joints. The knees, wrists, and small joints of the hands can be involved. In most cases of acute disease, lung and skin disease are also present. Chronic sarcoid arthritis typically involves one or maybe a few joints and due to its often erosive nature can be difficult to distinguish from RA.

Polymyalgia Rheumatica (PMR) / Temporal Arthritis

PMR is a form of arthritis that leads to inflammation of tendons, muscles, ligaments, and tissues around the joints. It is characterized by large muscle (shoulders, hips, thighs, neck) pain, aching, morning stiffness, fatigue, and in some cases, fever. It can be associated with temporal arthritis/giant-cell arthritis (TA/GCA) which is a related but more serious condition in which inflammation of large blood vessels can lead to complications such as blindness, aneurysms and cramping pain in the arms or legs (limb claudication) due to inflammation and narrowing of the large blood vessels in the chest and extremities. PMR is diagnosed when the clinical picture is accompanied by elevated markers of inflammation (ESR and/or CRP). If temporal arthritis is suspected (headache, vision changes, limb claudication), biopsy of a temporal artery may be necessary to make the diagnosis.

PMR and TA/GCA can present with symmetric inflammatory arthritis similar to RA. These diseases can usually be distinguished by blood tests. In addition, headaches, acute vision changes, and large muscle pain are uncommon in RA, and if these are present, PMR and/or TA/GCA should be considered.

Infectious Arthritis

Many infections can present with arthritis either due to direct joint infection or due to autoimmune joint inflammation. In most cases, infections lead to acute single joint arthritis; however, in some cases, chronic arthritis affecting a few or many joints can be present. Because missed infections can lead to significant complications, it is crucial to have a high index of suspicion for infection in any patient presenting with acute or chronic arthritis.

Lyme disease

Lyme disease is an infection due to a type of bacteria called a spirochete. The disease is manifested by a skin rash, swollen joints and flu-like symptoms, caused from the bite of an infected tick. Symptoms may include:

• A skin rash, often resembling a bulls-eye (target lesion);

• Fever;

• Headache;

• Muscle pain;

• Stiff neck; and

• Swelling of knees and other large joints.

The diagnosis of Lyme disease is typically made by blood testing. If, however, chronic single joint arthritis develops, joint fluid analysis or joint tissue biopsy may be necessary for diagnosis. Lyme arthritis can usually be distinguished from RA by clinical presentation and blood tests.

Acute rheumatic fever (ARF)

Acute rheumatic fever is an inflammatory disease that may develop after an infection with the Streptococcus bacteria (strep throat or scarlet fever). The disease can affect the heart, joints, skin, and brain. Symptoms include:

• Fever;

• Joint pain;

• Arthritis (mainly in the knees, elbows, ankles, and wrists);

• Joint swelling; redness or warmth;

• Abdominal pain;

• Skin rash

• Skin nodules;

• A peculiar movement disorder (Sydenham’s chorea)

• Nosebleeds;

• Heart problems, which can be asymptomatic.

The diagnosis of ARF is made by clinical assessment and blood testing for antibodies against streptococcal proteins. ARF and RA can have similar clinical features including arthritis and nodules. However, ARF can usually be distinguished from RA by clinical presentation. Rash and migratory arthritis are unusual in RA. The use of blood tests is also helpful.

Viral arthritis (hepatitis B and C, parvovirus, EBV, HIV)

Arthritis may be a symptom of many viral illnesses. This makes viral infections a great masquerader. The duration is usually short, and it usually disappears on its own without any lasting effects. Clinical features in adults:

• Joint symptoms occur in up to 60%. These can be symmetric and affect the small joints of the hands, wrists, and ankles as well as the knees. Morning stiffness is also present.

• Parvovirus B19 is a very common viral infection that looks like RA.

• Diagnosis of viral arthritis is made by serologic testing. A high percentage of patients with hepatitis C may have elevated titers of RF. Therefore, RF testing is not helpful in distinguishing between hepatitis C infection and RA. However, in these situations, testing for anti-CCP can be helpful as anti-CCP antibodies have not been shown to be significantly elevated in isolated hepatitis C infections.

So as you can see… “it ain’t easy…”


Symptoms Of Lupus Erythematosus Treatment

Arthritis is a term that groups together over 100 rheumatic diseases and other related conditions that cause stiffness, swelling and pain in the joints of the body. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that causes chronic inflammation of the joints. Arthritis is inflammation of one or more joints, which results in pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited movement. Arthritis is a chronic disease that will be with you for a long time and possibly for the rest of your life. Arthritis is one of the most rapidly growing chronic conditions in North America. Arthritis is due to the wearing down of cartilage, which is the material that cushions the ends of the bones. Because it can affect multiple other organs of the body, rheumatoid arthritis is referred to as a systemic illness and is sometimes called rheumatoid disease. While rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic illness, meaning it can last for years, patients may experience long periods without symptoms. Typically, however, rheumatoid arthritis is a progressive illness that has the potential to cause joint destruction and functional disability.

Doctors don’t know the exact cause of rheumatoid arthritis.

Causes include injury (leading to osteoarthritis), abnormal metabolism (such as gout and pseudogout), inheritance, infections, and unclear reasons (such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus). The causes of arthritis depend on the form of arthritis. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms, Causes and Treatment. When most people think of arthritis, they think of a condition that most often strikes the older population. No one knows exactly what causes juvenile arthritis.

Symptoms often include pain, stiffness, swelling, redness, and heat in the joints. Symptoms, which include stiffness, swelling, pain and joint damage, are a result of the inflammation of the joints in the body. Symptoms usually do not last a lifetime and tend to disappear after several months or years. Symptoms of arthritis include pain and limited function of joints. Symptoms can range from an annoyance to the complete inability to use affected joints. Symptoms of psoriatic arthritis come and go but it is a lifelong condition.

Treatment can include patient education, self-management programs, and support groups that help people learn about:Treatments, How to exercise and relax ,How to talk with their doctor, Problem solving. Treatment for rheumatoid arthritis may involve:Lifestyle changes,Medicine,Surgery,Regular doctor visits,Alternative therapies. Treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis with transdermal estrogen. Treatment of arthritis depends on the particular cause, which joints are affected, severity, and how the condition affects your daily activities. Treatment, therefore, aims at reducing your pain and discomfort and preventing further disability. Treatment for most forms of arthritis includes medications, exercise, and rest. Treatment of juvenile arthritis is designed to reduce swelling, maintain movement of affected joints and relieve pain, as well as identify, treat and prevent complications.

Patients with autoimmune diseases have antibodies in their blood that target their own body tissues, where they can be associated with inflammation. Patients with recent joint injuries or surgery, or patients receiving medications injected directly into a joint are also at a greater risk for developing septic arthritis. Patients with severe damage to bone or cartilage may need reconstructive surgery, but it cannot be performed until the infection is completely gone. Patients receiving corticosteroid injections into the joints for osteoarthritis may want to weigh this treatment method against the increased risk of septic arthritis.

Drugs can be used for pain relief, to reduce swelling, and to stop the disease from getting worse.

Some forms of arthritis may also affect other areas of the body, such as the skin, heart, or kidneys. Psoriatic arthritis usually starts out as psoriasis, a condition where areas of the skin become inflamed and covered with silvery grey scales. a€œAutoimmunitya€ is a condition whereby the immune system(which normally wards off foreign invaders of the body, such as infections)turns and attacks the body’s own tissues, such as skin, joints, liver, lungs,etc. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause other problems in the body, such as vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels), osteoporosis (loss of bone density), lung disease, rheumatoid nodules (small bumps) under the skin, and blood disorders.

Arthritis Statistics: Arthritis is a widespread problem throughout the world, with many people experiencing some form of the disease. As the state’s population continues to age, the number of people affected by arthritis is expected to continue to increase. An diagnosis of arthritis is based on the pattern of symptoms, medicalhistory, family history, physical examination, X-rays and lab tests.

Alexis Kenne

http://www.extend-yourlife.com

http://www.goodhealthguaranteed.com


Signs Of Lupus Flare Up

Arthritis means “inflammation of joints.” Yet when older people are afflicted with arthritis, they tend to be bothered less by the inflammation and more by the pain and stiffness that accompany arthritis.

Many people assume arthritis to be an unavoidable part of growing old. Although aging itself does not cause arthritis, arthritis does become more common as people age, for various reasons. The development of arthritis brings many older people much distress. Anyone can get Arthritis. It is just one of over one hundred and seventy types of rheumatic diseases which include many types of arthritis, gout, carpal tunnel syndrome, lupus, bursitis, juvenile arthritis, Kawasaki Syndrome, fibromyalgia, and many more. These diseases are known to affect one of any joints found in the human body.

Types of Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis can develop relatively quickly: in weeks as opposed to the years it takes for osteoarthritis. It is an irreversible autoimmune disease, a condition where the body’s own immune system attacks specific cells in the joints. It often starts in younger people and ultimately results in the breakdown of bone.

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. Cartilage between the bones gradually wastes away and this can lead to painful rubbing of bone on bone in the joints. It may also cause joints to fall out of their natural positions (misalignment). The most frequently affected joints are in the hands, spine, knees and hips. Osteoarthritis mostly affects people aged between 40 and 60; it grows more common with age. Around 12% of people over 65 are affected.

Pseudogout is a form of arthritis that occurs when a particular type of calcium crystal accumulates in the joints. As more of these crystals are deposited in the affected joint, they can cause a reaction that leads to severe pain and swelling. The swelling can be either short-term or long-term and occurs most frequently in the knee, although it can also affect the wrist, shoulder, ankle, elbow, or hand. The pain caused by pseudogout is sometimes so excruciating that it can incapacitate someone for days.

Psoriatic arthritis is a complication of psoriasis, a chronic skin disease that is characterized by bright pink or salmon-colored scales covering the knees, elbows, chest, back, or scalp. While most people with psoriasis do not develop arthritis, around 15% do. About 75% of people develop psoriatic arthritis only after the skin condition appears, although in some people the arthritis occurs before the skin condition.

Symptoms

Symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis can range in severity, varying a great deal from person to person.

People with rheumatoid arthritis may have a mild course, occasional flare-ups with long periods of remission without disease, or a steadily progressive disease, which may be slow or rapid. Rheumatoid arthritis may start suddenly, with many joints becoming inflamed at the same time. More often, it starts subtly, gradually affecting different joints. Usually, the inflammation is symmetric, with joints on both sides of the body affected.

Symptoms can include:

1.loss of appetite and generally feeling unwell (early symptoms),

2.Aching/ throbbing pain in the affected joints, which may come and go. This is often worse after a nights sleep and after sitting for a while. Exercise usually helps to reduce the pain,

3.The affected joints often feel stiff. Again this often improves once you start moving around; early morning stiffness is a characteristic of joint inflammation.


Lupus Cures

Lupus Pain Relief

Author: Scott Michale

While lupus can be a debilitating disease, it doesn’t have to be. If you can find a way to relieve the pain of lupus, you can continue on with most of your normal, day to day activities.

Here are some ways you can find Lupus Pain relief

Consider NSAIDs

Lupus can cause pain, swelling and stiffness of the joints. NSAIDs (or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) can relieve all of these symptoms.

Lupus can also cause chest pains, usually the result of swelling around the heart and lungs. NSAIDs can relieve this swelling and the resulting pain.

There are many NSAIDs available over the counter. Some of them include aspirin, naproxen sodium (found in Aleve) and ibuprofen (found in Motrin). There are also prescription strength NSAIDs that are much stronger and can be prescribed to you by a doctor. However, be careful. Taking these drugs can cause stomach problems. In fact, if you already suffer from stomach problems, like ulcers, you should avoid taking NSAIDs.

Ask Your Doctor about Antimalarial Drugs

Many people suffering from lupus can go for long periods when their symptoms decrease, or even disappear altogether. On the other hand, they can also experience flares, periods when their symptoms, including pain, are unusually severe.

Doctors have found that antimalarial drugs, drugs meant to prevent and treat malaria, can also be used to prevent flares. And while there can be some side effects (like muscle weakness and vision problems) many find them easier to deal with than the pain a lupus flare can cause.

There was a time when those suffering from lupus just had to suffer with the pain their condition caused. But thanks to advances in medical science, you can find lupus pain relief.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/diseases-and-conditions-articles/lupus-pain-relief-1687937.html

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http://www.lupuspainrelief.com


Disseminated Lupus Erythematosus

Symptoms And Types Of Connective Tissue Disease

Author: David Crawford

Four rather unusual and rare diseases are now being grouped together by medical investigators as a result of information derived from recent research. Their names, which are little known to the public, are polyarteritis nodosa, diffuse lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, and dermatomyositis.

They resemble each other in that all of them represent disturbances of connective tissue in the body, in contrast to glandular tissue or surface secreting tissue. The connective tissue of the body includes what is elastic and the material between the cells. Sometimes tumors consist almost wholly of connective or fibrous tissue. The walls of blood vessels contain much tissue of this type.

Now the big fact about these conditions is that all of them are benefited at least temporarily by use of ACTH or Cortisone. All of them resemble also the reactions that occur in tissues in response to hypersensitivity or allergy.

Polyarteritis Nodosa
Polyarteritis nodosa is a disease in which the blood vessels are chiefly affected. Because this disease is primarily serious damage of blood vessels, it may be reflected in any part of the body. The condition affects men four times as often as women and, mostly, those between twenty and forty years old. Arthritis and many of the reactions associated with hypersensitivity are seen by the doctor in these patients.

Lupus Erythematosus
Disseminated lupus erythematosus is chronic, usually severe disorder occurring mostly in females fifteen to forty years old. A characteristic is a butterfly-shaped inflammation over the nose. Other symptoms involve the joints and the heart. Fever a anemia and a progressive course make the disease fatal.

Scleroderma
Scleroderma is a disease that affects the connective tissue of the body and particularly that in the skin where there is hardening. Chiefly women between thirty and fifty years old are affected. The swelling in the skin may be followed by calcification. This disease comes on slowly a insidiously, but as it progresses changes occur in the skin of the face, neck, and arms. The skin looks waxy and tight and loses its color a hair. When the face is involved there may be difficulty in moving the jaw. Fortunately this is not a common disease; certainly it is not serious as polyarteritis nodosa or diffuse lupus erythematosusw, which similar. In the older forms of treatment emphasis was placed on the use of thyroid and vitamins. Great care was given to prevent secondary infections. More recently attention is being focused on the use of ACTH and Cortisone.

Dermatomyositis
Fourth in this group of collagen disorders is one called dermatomyositis. This is a common and often fatal disorder involving the skin and the muscles. The exact cause is still unknown. It affects people of all races and colors, both men and women, and in general those between the ages of ten and fifty years.

Characteristic of this condition is the involvement of the muscles. As they deteriorate the organs concerned show effects, as in the eyes, throat, diaphragm, or muscles between the ribs. The symptoms then are difficulties of vision, swallowing, breathing, speech, etc. Naturally such people lose weight and get weak. Unfortunately this condition progressive and few who have it live long. Until recently little was known about treatment, and vitamins, hormones and physical therapy were tried. Salicylates were thought to be beneficial. Now we know that the salicylates can to a small extent stimulate the condition.

Arthritis
Rheumatism is a word used to describe a number of diseases, acute or chronic, which are accompanied by pain and stiffness of the muscles, the joints and other tissues involved in movement. Arthritis is the term used to describe inflammation of the joints only.

The joint includes the ends of bones, cartilages between the ends, a capsule holding it all together, ligaments which attach the muscles to the bones, membranes and the joint fluid. Nerves accompany the blood vessels into the joints; while the bones and cartilage do not feel pain, inflammation and swelling with the pouring of extra fluid into the joint can produce exquisite pain.

People with arthritis can be quite eloquent about their joints. The pain may be described as excruciating, throbbing, burning, aching, squeezing, or just hurting. The patients also complain of crackling, stiffness, and loss of motion.

The American Rheumatism Association has classified arthritis into seven types:

  1. – due to infection
  2. – due to rheumatic fever
  3. – rheumatoid
  4. – degenerative
  5. – due to injuries
  6. – due to gout
  7. – arising from the nervous system

 

Rheumatoid arthritis is not just a disease of the joints, but a general condition affecting the whole body. While the exact cause or causes may not be known, the discovery of the effects of ACTH and Cortisone have led to new concepts of the nature of the disease. Now rheumatoid arthritis along with a number of other conditions is called a “collagen” disease. In all of these the connective tissue of the body is chiefly concerned. The tendency is to consider rheumatoid arthritis a reaction of the body to sensitivity to certain substances, perhaps coming from bacteria, with the sensitivity affecting the connective tissue chiefly. The suggestion has also been made that rheumatism is not a specific reaction to some single substance but a general reaction of the body resulting from several different stimulations.

Women are affected by rheumatoid arthritis three times as often as men. Rheumatoid arthritis varies from being an acute disease with fever and sudden disability of many joints to a condition that develops gradually in which the patient may at first notice only stiffness or pain in one joint. Some may have deformity of a joint without ever having felt any pain. Sometimes the first signs of rheumatoid arthritis are fatigue, loss of appetite and loss of weight. Patients complain of numbness and loss of feeling in hands and arms, feet or legs. Sometimes the lymph glands near the joint become swollen. Because of failure to move and use the muscles around the swollen joint, the tissue breaks down and the area looks thin and wasted.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a condition that comes and goes. Doctors have noticed particularly that it disappears during pregnancy and during jaundice.   The sooner good treatment can be applied to rheumatoid arthritis the better are the results secured in stopping the progress and the damage done by the disease. While the disease is active, rest and freedom from motion are helpful. If there is fever and severe pain certainly confinement to bed is desirable. Then as these troubles subside motion is permitted, but never to the point of fatigue. During the severe stages the patients are anxious and disturbed, often by solicitous people, and the doctor must protect the patient against emotional upsets.

No special diet cures arthritis. Nevertheless the patient with rheumatoid arthritis needs to be sustained with sufficient proteins, vitamins and minerals and enough carbohydrates and fats to provide needed energy and to avoid damage to tissues. Good animal proteins, calcium and iron must be adequate in the diet.

For many years a mainstay in treating arthritis has been the application of heat. Heat may be applied by hot bricks wrapped in towels, hot water bottles, electric heat pads, infra-red heat lamps, heat cradles containing incandescent bulbs, and other methods. If many joints are involved relief frequently comes from a hot tub bath once or twice a day, but prolonged hot baths are weakening.

People do not die of rheumatoid arthritis but complications may occur which are especially serious for the arthritic patient. Troubles with the lungs including pneumonia, damage to the heart and secondary infections are a threat.
Rheumatoid arthritis may be especially serious for children because of deformities that persist throughout life. A severe form of rheumatoid arthritis in childhood is known as “Still’s disease.” Another form of rheumatoid arthritis is associated with psoriasis, and there are arthritic manifestations that affect women in the menopause.

Rheumatoid arthritis affecting the spine is a crippling condition responsible for much disability. This condition usually occurs in men rather than in women. Pains in the back, soreness on bending over, painful buttocks, and shooting pains in the sciatic nerve area are accompaniments.

With spasms of the spinal muscles comes a tendency to avoid movement and in some instances the stiff-poker spine develops. Hot, wet packs help to relieve the spasm of the muscles. Use of salicylates for relief, heat, mild massage and liniments are reported beneficial in securing relief for those with degenerative arthritis.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/diseases-and-conditions-articles/symptoms-and-types-of-connective-tissue-disease-1533997.html

About the Author

David Crawford is the CEO and owner of a Natural Male Enhancement company known as Male Enhancement Group which is dedicated to researching and comparing male enhancement products in order to determine which male enhancement product is safer and more effective than other products on the market. Copyright 2009 David Crawford of http://www.maleenhancementgroup.com/. This article may be freely distributed if this resource box stays attached.


Types Of Lupus

Comprehending The Various Types Of Arthritis

Author: Brent McNutt

Until and unless you are diagnosed having a distinct type of arthritis, you might not realize that you will find several diverse sorts of arthritis that could affect you or someone that you love. Let’s take a look at the various sorts of arthritis that we are aware of.

Osteoarthritis – This is the most common type of arthritis, and many older people have this to some degree. Osteoarthritis happens when cartilage that cushions the ends of the bones – where the joints are – starts to wear down. The more the cartilage wears down, the more pain and swelling you will have in that joint.

Rheumatoid Arthritis – Rheumatoid is the second most common form of arthritis. This is actually an autoimmune disease, wherein your cells are actually attacking numerous joints, as well as soft tissues. It can occur whether there has been wear and tear of the cartilage of the joints or not, and age is not a factor, however when it occurs in a young person, it is called Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Gouty Arthritis – If you have a great deal of pain and swelling either in your largest toe, or in your knee, you could be suffering from this type of arthritis. This occurs because there is an accumulation of urate crystals in the joint. This type of arthritis can be treated with medication and a special diet.

Lupus Arthritis – Lupus is an autoimmune disease, but Lupus Arthritis is actually just a side affect of Lupus, and not considered an autoimmune disease itself. Typically, this type of arthritis will occur in the wrists, knees, and hands.

Pseudogout Arthritis – Similar to Gout Arthritis, Pseudogout Arthritis is actually caused by an accumulation of calcium in the joints. The most common joint that is affected by Pseudogout Arthritis is the knee joint.

Infectious Arthritis – This is essentially caused by an infection in the joint. Due to the infection, the joint becomes inflamed. This may also be referred to as Septic Arthritis or Bacterial Arthritis, and it can be very serious. The end result of this type of arthritis is that the infection must be treated, of course, but you may also require surgery to have the infection completely removed from the joint as well.

Hemorrhagic Arthritis – This type of arthritis is actually caused by bleeding in the joint. The blood essentially accumulates, causing pain and swelling. Normally, if you have this type of arthritis, it is because you have a bleeding disorder as well.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/health-articles/comprehending-the-various-types-of-arthritis-1863723.html

About the Author

Brent McNutt is a avid hiker and takes pleasure in hiking and camping with buddies. He is also a proud parent and enjoys playing golf with his 2 sons as well as close acquaintances. He likewise loves marketing and advertising landau shoes on the web to health care professionals


Neonatal Lupus

About Lupus: An Overview

Author: Scott Michale

Why do you need to know about lupus? Because this sometimes debilitating condition is more common than many realize. Millions of people are suffering from lupus, and many of them don’t realize this is what’s causing there pain and discomfort. And knowing about lupus and its symptoms can be the first step to getting diagnosed and treated.

Lupus is an inflammatory disease. Usually, having a strong and active immune system is a good thing. It fights off infection and helps to keep you healthy. But, in those suffering from lupus, the immune system actually turns on their own bodies, attacking healthy tissues and organs, like the kidneys, heart, lungs, joints, and even skin. The result is pain and, in some cases, disfigurement.

Visit us at Lupus Pain relief

There are four different kinds of lupus. And they are:

* Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
* Discoid Lupus Erythematosus
* Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus
* Neonatal Lupus

The most common type of lupus is Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. It is also the type that can be the most severe. This form of lupus can affect just about every area of the body, including the blood cells. Because it is so common, when most people talk about lupus, this is usually the type of lupus they are referring to.

While many people have an inherited predisposition to developing lupus, not all of them actually do. Doctors believe that something environmental, like a virus or certain medications, act as a trigger that can cause someone with an inherited predisposition to lupus to actually develop the disease.

While both men and women can suffer from lupus, the condition is most commonly found in women. In fact, women between puberty and menopause are most at risk for developing the disease.

What should you do if you suspect you have this sometimes debilitating condition? Well learning more about lupus is your first step. Learn what your treatment options are, and what you can do to keep living a full and active life.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/diseases-and-conditions-articles/about-lupus-an-overview-1077249.html

About the Author

For more info visit us at Lupus Pain relief


Lupus Erythematosus Syndrome

Are There Any Natural Treatments For Lupus?

Author: Dr Mosaraf Ali

Question:

I have just been diagnosed with lupus. The treatment seems to be steroids and anti-inflammatory drugs, but the thought of having to take them fills me with horror because of the side effects. Are there any natural treatments that will help? 

Answer:

Lupus, or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), is an autoimmune disease that affects many organs and systems in the body. Normally the immune system produces antibodies against invading elements from outside, such as germs or allergens. In the case of autoimmune disease, the antibodies are produced against a perceived enemy within the body’s organs. It’s really a question of mistaken identity examples of autoimmune diseases include rheumatoid arthritis (which affects the joint); scleroderma, vitiligo and psoriasis(t he skin); ankylosing spondylitis (the  spine and hip joints), and sarcoidosis (which manifests in the lungs, eyes and lymph nodes). Lupus, however, is an extreme form, in which man), organs and systems are attacked together or individually. The symptoms occur as a result of the inflammation that is set up by the attack.

We don’t know what initiates this bizarre reaction. Steroid drugs are frequently used to prevent the antibodies from homing in on the different organs and causing inflammation and destruction. Sometimes, however, the immune response is so violent that powerful immunosuppressant drugs are used to contain the reaction. But these can have many side effects, ranging from gastrointestinal problems to more serious damage.

The immune system is controlled by the master pituitary gland through the adrenals, which produce natural steroid hormones. I have experimented with a multidisciplinary and multisystem approach to manage autoimmune disease such as lupus. The logic behind it is that, since you do not know the cause and because of the way that the disease manifests itself, it is wise to treat the whole being. The body seems to respond to this approach and many of my patients have experienced a remission.

I usually ask the person to change their entire lifestyle. The programme of diet massage, exercise and relaxation is explained in more detail in my book The Integrated Health Bible and on Dr Ali’s Lifestyle DVD (Integrated Health Group).

To boost energy and relieve strain on the body, I recommend the following

Diet

* Juice fresh carrots, apples and peeled root ginger and drink daily.

* Make a broth by boiling a chopped organic chicken with cinnamon and bay leaves for two hours, then cool, skim and strain. Drink one mug of stock 30 to 45 minutes before dinner every day.

* Avoid yeast products, which produce toxic alcohols and may lead to leaky gut  syndrome, draining the body’s energy system. This puts extra strain on the immune system and reduces the body’s ability to deal with crises.

* Also avoid alcohol, caffieine, excess salt, sugar, citric fruits, canned products, spicy foods, cheese, mushrooms and vinegar. These alt overexert the digestive system.

Supplements

* Ashwaganda: take one twice daily for three months to boost energy and help the immune system to regulate itself.

* Chawanprash: take one tablespoonful of this Ayurvedic tonic after breakfast for three months.

* Haldi: take one twice daily for three months to help with the inflammation.

* If you have to take strong drugs that affect your stomach, take Stomach Formula  two twice daily for two months, to control stomach acid.

Massage

The neck and shoulder area with Lifestyle Oil, or mix two tablespoons of sweet almond oil with three drops of lavender essential oil, to improve the blood flow to the brain and help regulate the function of the pituitary gland. Do this twice a week for three to four months; it is a very powerful and effective physical therapy. Rub the affected joints with Joint Oil or Weleda Massage Balm, daily for three to four months.

Exercise

Daily, such as walking, swimming, yoga or t’ai chi.

Practise relaxation breathing in the evenings and whenever you feel stressed. Inhale for a count of three, hold the breath for three, then exhale for six. Also listen to music, meditate, pray and/or chant. All this helps to relieve stress and calm the mind so that the pain and distress become easier to bear.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/alternative-medicine-articles/are-there-any-natural-treatments-for-lupus-1944200.html

About the Author

I have obtained MD in General Medicine with Honours in 1980 and joined The Central Institute of Advanced Medical Studies in Moscow for post graduation in Acupuncture. I have completed diploma courses in Acupuncture, Anesthesia, Iridology, Hypnotherapy and Clinical Fasting. Practicing as Integrated Medicine expert.

Visit my health shop – http//www.drmalishop.com

121 Crawford Street, London, W1U 6BE