Diseases In The Lupus Family

There are a vast amount of patients who walk into a clinic desiring relief from their allergy issues. But what about those patients who suffer from Autoimmune diseases or Autism, also? Is there an allergy link there that the patient may not even be aware of? The National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimates up to 23.5 million Americans suffer from autoimmune disease and that the prevalence is rising. Researchers have identified 80-100 different autoimmune diseases and suspect at least 40 additional diseases of having an autoimmune basis. These diseases are chronic and can be life-threatening. Autoimmune disease is one of the top 10 leading causes of death in female children and women in all age groups up to 64 years of age. Then add Autism in it’s now epidemic and climbing rates. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates 1 in 150 children are diagnosed with autism. These statistics mean that every 20 minutes another child in America is diagnosed. [1]

Although there is much additional treatment necessary for both autoimmune disease and autism the fact remains that allergies play a significant role in these health concerns. When a patient walks through your office door with symptoms or diagnosis of one of the over 80 various autoimmune diseases, wouldn’t it be wise to address immediately any allergies that patient may have? Autoimmune disease studies are finding the correlation of allergies triggering the disease itself. A new study by researchers at Children’s and the University of Washington (UW) identifies a connection between allergic diseases and autoimmune diseases. The study was published in the April 1 edition of Nature Immunology. “Our study implies that allergic and inflammatory diseases may actually trigger autoimmune diseases by relaxing the controls that normally eliminate newly produced, self-reactive B cells. This is important because many autoimmune diseases are caused by self-reactive antibodies produced by such B cells” said Dr. David Rawlings lead researcher and section head of Immunology at Children’s Hospital and the UW. [2] If an allergy can actually trigger such diseases quick implementation treating those allergies is simply basic common sense.

In regard to autism, which not only affects a child but extends beyond to his / her family, schooling and as we are discovering; society in general every possible aspect for treatment must be considered. Therefore any allergy link needs to be addressed. Dr. Stephen M. Edelson from the Autism Research Institute writes, “People with autism are more susceptible to allergies and food sensitivities than the average person; and this is likely due to their impaired immune system. The best way to stop a reaction to a particular food substance is to remove that food from the person’s diet. Other treatments include taking nutrients to strengthen the immune system and giving the person sublingual drops, i.e., very small amount of the substance. In general, it is important that people realize that allergies and food sensitivities can affect one’s health and behavior, but these problems are treatable.” If treating these allergies is as simple as Allergy America’s sublingual drops makes it, shouldn’t every doctor offer this simple therapy as a means to help elevate symptoms in those suffering with autism?

Often we miss some of the basic measures that can produce relief from various ailments because we bypass the immediate opportunity for treatment, instead jumping ahead to tackle the greater issue. With sublingual drops, immediate treatment and recovery from a patient’s allergies not only happens, but in the case of autoimmune disease and autism, could also assist with reduction from symptoms or perhaps triggers of the disease manifesting itself.

1. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, Inc. (2008, November 22) Autoimmune Disease Stat Sheet

2. Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center of Seattle (2007, April 6). Connection Between Allergic Diseases And Autoimmune


Lupus Disease Symptoms Similar Diseases

A precise diagnosis for appendicitis has a high degree of difficulty, due to the resemblance of appendicitis’s symptoms to those indicating other inflammations. Thus, a frequent method is to keep under observation the patients with appendicitis suspicion for a temporal interval, to see their evolution. The problem may disappear, or develop to classic appendicitis or other disease.

It is the duty of the surgeon to eliminate the suspicion for any other condition similarly to appendicitis or that has similar symptoms. Such conditions are:

* – Meckel’s diverticulitis represents little excrescences of the small intestine which are usually found in the lower right abdomen right next to the appendix. Same as the appendix, the diverticulum can rupture or inflame and it is necessary to take it out by surgical intervention.

* – Pelvic inflammatory disease. Found closely to the appendix, the ovary and the right fallopian tube may be affected by sexually transmitted affections of infectious nature, but in most of the cases medication using antibiotics can successfully replace surgery.

* – Right upper abdomen conditions of inflammatory nature. Diseases like duodenal ulcer, gallbladder disease or affections of the liver may generate fluids drain from upper to lower right abdomen and cause a very similar inflammation to that of the appendix.

* – Right – side diverticulitis. By exception from the common situation of the left sided diverticulitis of the colon, there can also appear on the right side and, when rupturing, have a strong similarity to appendicitis.

* – Affections of the right kidney such as abscess which, due to the close position of the kidney to the appendix may simulate appendicitis.

Because many conditions of the abdomen share the same symptoms, the causes are in more than one case difficult to determine, but the good thing is that only few abdominal affections are so serious to require more than medication at home. So, the nature of pain is more likely to be determined by severity, location or other aspects.