Lupus is a disease that in many cases is characterized by the distinctive rash that once was thought to resemble a wolf bite. That’s why the disease got the name lupus, the latin word for wolf. However, there are cases when the distinctive rash does not occur, and it was seen that there are not two cases of lupus exactly alike. Signs and symptoms can be permanent or temporary, mild or severe, or they can develop slowly or come suddenly.
Many of the persons with lupus have periods when the disease is getting worse- the so-called flares-, and after that, the disease improves, or even disappears for a while.

Usually, the most common signs and symptoms of lupus develop at intervals, rather than all at once.A skin problem often associated with the disease is a butterfly-shaped rash that develops across the cheeks and bridge of the nose, and this rash can be flat or raised and may be blotchy or completely red in the affected areas.

Some people develop a crusty, red, raised rash which is also called discoid rash on the face, neck, chest or scalp, is usually thick and scaly, may last for days or years and often leaves hypopigmented or hyperpigmented scars. There are other people that develop skin lesions which look at first like small pimples and can turn scaly and itchy and others have large, flat, itchy lesions with clear centers.
A lot of types of glomerulonephritis can appear because of lupus. Glomerulonephritis is a condition that affects the kidneys’ ability to filter toxins, leading to kidney failure. In many cases kidney damage can appear without any warning signs or symptoms, but some of those with kidney problems may develop frothy or tea-colored urine, swelling in their ankles or lower legs, or high blood pressure.Arthritis is another sign of lupus. A lot of patients with lupus can develop joint pain, stiffness and swelling, mainly in their fingers, hands, wrists and knees. Lupus-associated arthritis usually isn’t deforming, comes and goes quickly, and the pain can be severe during a flare.Lupus patients are very sensitive to sunlight, they develop rashes on sun-exposed skin. It was seen that lupus can cause also brain or central nervous system problems, like headaches, seizures, vision problems, dizziness, behavior changes or stroke.Lupus can also cause lung problems, like pleurisy, which is an inflammation of the chest cavity lining that can produce sharp stabbing chest pain, and also heart problems, mucosal ulcers, and blood vessels disorders.

There are also other signs and symptoms that can appear and are not specific to lupus.
Fatigue, which is an ongoing, extreme exhaustion that’s usually not relieved by rest can appear, also there can show up an unexplained fever, Raynaud’s phenomenon- a condition in which your fingers, toes, nose and ears turn pale and numb when exposed to cold temperatures-, digestive problems- like abdominal pain, weight loss nausea and vomiting-, hair loss, depression and swelling.

So if you want to find more about Lupus or more details about systemic lupus please follow this link http://www.lupus-guide.com


5 thoughts on “Symptoms Of Lupus During Pregnancy

  1. dede

    How serious is Lupus during pregnancy?
    My daughter had preclampsia with her first pregnancy. She is approximately 9 wks. along and is showing signs of the condition already. Last week her doctor told her that current symptoms she is having all point to the possibility of Lupus. He ran some test, and said depending on the test results may decide to hospitalize her for a few days for further testing and begin a treatment plan. I am terribly worried for my daughter and her unborn baby. Just wondered if anyone out their has experienced somewhat the same, and looking for some feedback. Thank you in advance.

    1. Anonymous

      Don’t worry. Lupus rarely affects the baby of a woman who has it, but it isn’t nice at all for the mother. Often women contract Lupus whilst pregnant or after they’ve had a baby, as Lupus is often triggered by this. I once knew a woman who had her Lupus at its very worse after she had her first baby. I’ve known 2 women with it, and the second one was so exhausted she spent most of a year in a wheelchair. But Lupus is rarely fatal nowadays, and it’s not disfiguring. They usually use steroids to treat it. (I’m not talking about illegal drugs, I’m talking about medical drugs that have nothing to do with muscle building). Lupus can range in severity. Your daughter’s baby will be fine.

      I’m not going to guarantee you that everything, including the baby, will be ship-shape and fine and dandy, but it is VERY likely. I know the woman above gave you some bad news about premature or ill babies, but the truth is, the two women I know have had 2 or more babies, all completely normal and healthy. Seriously. Not trying to make you feel better. Have a little faith, dear:) Good luck xxx

  2. ceebs

    ANA Positive… Should I try to get pregnant?
    Hello,

    I’m new to this board but come here seeking advice and support because I’m scared. I found out yesterday I am ANA positive (1:80 titer) with no symptoms. My mom has advanced lupus, and family history of autoimmune.

    We were trying for our second child (after two early miscarriages) when I found out I am ANA positive with speckled pattern.

    Do you think there’s a risk of triggering full-blown lupus with a second child? Does the stress on your body during pregnancy make a predisposition trigger disease? I’d really love insight… I’m at a crossroads, and want to make sure I don’t jeopardize my health or my family in the future.

    Thank you for any insight!

    Ceebs

    1. mgunnycappo

      I would check to see if you have Antiphospholipid Syndrome or APS that often accompanies lupus. APS is the main reason for miscarriage in Lupus. Since you’ve already have a miscarriage and you have a positive ANA (although 1:80 is a very low positive), and you have a family history I would definitely get checked for APS. They should also run a complete Lupus panel on you including Anti-SM, Anti-Ro, Anti-DS-DNA. If you test positive for any of these it is extremely likely that you have Lupus. If you do not test positive you could still have Lupus.

      Pregnancy can bring on Lupus symptoms due to the hormonal changes, stress on the body and the baby itself. In some women there are reports that pregnancy sometimes quiets a Lupus flare but the former is much more prevailant.

      I would discuss all of this first with a rheumatologist then with a high risk OB/GYN.

      Good luck to you.

  3. Anonymous

    Test positive for Lupus?
    I dont think I have it, Because Ive never had any symptoms that I know of?! Has anyone else had a false positive for Lupus during pregnancy? thanks.
    Thats not true! Because I was told by my dr it is possible to get a false positive for it!

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