The condition in which the meninges and cerebrospinal fluid around the brain get inflammed due to an attack by bacteria, viruses or fungii known as meningitis. Due to the closeness of the infection to the brain meningitis can sometimes turn serious and deadly. The seriousness of the infection would be determined by the causative reasons and at what stage the infection is.Meningitis symptoms are typically characterized by bad headaches, stiff neck, tiredness, vomiting, fever , leg pain, dull skin tone and difficulty in consuming food and drinks.

After visiting my third doctor in seven days he had only one piece of advice for me, “Get to the nearest hospital…NOW!” The closest hospital was 20 minutes away, I made it there in 7 breaking the Australian land speed record in the process.Straight away the doctors put me in for a brain scan. As I waited for the results the doctors told me it was one of three things: viral meningitis; bacterial meningitis or a brain hemorrhage.They told me I should hope for the first one as the last two can be fatal. So now I was praying to God for viral meningitis! For what seemed like an eternity the doctor came back in to deliver the news.

Meningitis is an inflammation of the tissue surrounding the brain. While some types of meningitis cause just mild, flu like symptoms, others are serious enough to cause death within several hours. Some children, although not becoming ill, may carry the virus causing meningitis; contagious to others through respiratory secretions. The most common types of the disease are viral and bacterial, with different strains of each resulting from multiple causes. Since each type can begin with the same symptoms, it is important to seek medical help as soon as possible for an accurate diagnosis.

Viral and bacterial meningitis are the most common forms of this disease. There are many symptoms that might accompany the disease, one of which is meningitis rash. The rash takes different forms with each, although there are similarities as well. It may appear as just a few spots on some people, cover the majority of the body in other people, while no rash at all may be experienced by others.

Causes

The infection can be caused by bacteria, viruses or even fungi. The infection is usually caused by viruses, less commonly by bacteria and even less commonly by fungi. The disease is usually serious if it is caused by bacteria as it can turn deadly and necessary treatment should be administered immediately. Bacterial meningitis can be caused by a number of organisms such as neisseria meningitis. streptococcus pneumonial, haemophilus influenza and listeria cytocenes. The bacteria attack the individual by penetrating into the blood stream and ultimately moving towards the brain and spinal cord.

Meningitis is an inflammation of the leptomeninges and underlying subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Meningitis is the inflammation of the protective membranes covering the central nervous system, known collectively as the meninges. Meningitis is a disease involving inflammation, or irritation, of the meninges. Most cases of meningitis are caused by microorganisms, such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites, that spread into the blood and into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

Many of the bacteria or viruses that can cause meningitis are fairly common and are more often associated with other everyday illnesses. Sometimes, however, they spread to the meninges from an infection in another part of the body. The meninges are composed of three layers of membranes enclosing the brain and spinal cord. Pia mater is the innermost layer. It is akin to a tissue paper that closely adheres to the brain and spinal cord, dipping into the various folds and crevices. Arachnoid mater is the middle layer. It is a filmy membrane that is joined to the pia mater by fine threads resembling a cobweb.

Viral infection, Fungal infection, A reaction to medications, A reaction to medical treatments, Lupus, Some forms of cancer, A trauma to the head or back. Anyone can catch meningitis. This is especially true if your immune system is weak.Meningitis often begins like the flu does. The major meningitis symptoms include a severe headache that will not go away, stiffness in the neck, stiffness in the upper back, pain in one or both eyes, or an aversion to light, nausea, or the feeling of an upset stomach, vomiting, achy body, fever, sleepy feeling, or the feeling that you just cannot wake up completely, confusion, or a feeling of just not being with it.

Treatment for Meningitis Tips

1. Acute bacterial meningitis requires prompt treatment with intravenous antibiotics to ensure recovery and reduce the risk of complications.

2. Pneumovax (also known as Prevenar) against Streptococcus pneumoniae is recommended for all people 65 years of age or older.

3. Drugs such as dexamethasone are sometimes given to reduce inflammation or to reduce the chance, or spread, of septicemia.

4. Antifungals to combat the infection are usually administered, as well as fluids and
medicine to control pain and fever.

Those who only know one or two facts about meningitis can be confused by misleading information. The best way to help those who are misled is to gently correct them with the truths you're learning here. All information about Meningitis on this article is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

Bacterial meningitis is caused from different types of bacteria and viral meningitis can be from a complication of chickenpox. Today, most children are now vaccinated against
chickenpox therefore this can rule out this type of meningitis in most cases.If your meningitis facts are out-of-date, how will that affect your actions and decisions? Make certain you don't let important meningitis information slip by you.Bacterial meningitis must be treated quickly. Severe bacterial meningitis will require intravenous antibiotics. Antibiotics cannot be used to treat viral meningitis because they do not kill viruses. The best prevention against meningitis is to, of course, be vaccinated if at all possible.

About the author:

Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/health-fitness-articles/general-health-articles/viral-meningitiscauses-treatments-29222.html


is lupus contagious skin

35 thoughts on “Is Lupus Contagious Skin

  1. letschat:)

    Please help me….what could make me feel so bad. I am desperate for help?
    What would make all my muscles and joints ache. I have a really bad rash thats raised big and red with blisters the blisters are kind of drippy, they are all over my body. They don’t itch but they hurt really bad. I have a really bad fever and my throat hurts. It is getting more and more difficult to breathe, it feels like something else is already inside my chest. It is so weird my right hand is not working too good right now it looks kind of like a lobster claw. I am starting to get the rash on my scalp I mean am I gonna loose my hair? The rash is in the nether reigons too, talk about pain. I feel really dizzy too. I hope it is not contagious when nobody could see the rash I held my new grandbaby twins. They are so cute, so tiny, a little premature.
    Any ideas on what is wrong with me?
    Thank you for your help in advance.

    1. Ann

      I’m no doctor but it sounds like Lupus…

      Lupus symptoms include:

      Mild to extreme fatigue
      Joint Pain
      Skin rashes
      Sensitivity to Light
      Headaches or memory loss
      Chest Pain
      Anxiety
      Fever
      Weight change
      Swollon Glands

      Also can lead to inflammation of your lungs, which would account for your breathing problems.

      You need to go to the doctor immediatly. There are treatments for lupus.

    1. Dirrty Dani

      hey 🙂
      red patches on the skin could be caused by irritation and/or infection. However, i seriously doubt it has anything to do with the woman having lupus. Lupus is a condition that affects the person’s internal organs etc but it is not contagious and does not cause other people to experience symptoms of any form from sexual intercourse or other sexual acts. If the red patches cease to disappear I would advise you to visit your local sex clinic or go see your GP. A simple urine test may be required. Hope this helps. If you need any more advice feel free to contact me.

  2. Mike C

    Questions on Lupus, just found out my girl friend has it….?
    My girl friend of 6 months just found out she has Lupus, I have never heard of it untilol now. I have some questions that are on my mind…

    Is it transmitted sexually? Can I get it considering we have had sex together with out a condom, sleep in a bed?

    Can it be passed on in birth?

    Is it treatable?

    any information will be great, thank you

    1. N

      Lupus is an autoimmune disorder meaning that the body’s cells begin to attack parts of the body. It is not contagious or sexually transmitted. It is more common in females. Lupus causes many symptoms including joint pain, fevers, skin conditions, fatigue etc.
      There are medications which can alleviate the symptoms and reduce flare ups of the disease. There is no cure.
      Please try to support her as this will be a difficult time for her being diagnosed with a chronic disease.

    1. wantsshy

      There are four kinds of Lupus I am assuming your friend had the more severe kind ( S.L.E. ) . Lupus is an autoimmune disorder. It is not contagious nor is does it come from a virus like Aids comes from HIV so in those ways it is NOT like AIDS, and it is not like cancer either
      Unfortunately with an autoimmune disorder like lupus the body’s immune system goes haywire and begins attacking things within the body that it should not. Things like the Kidney’s, the heart, rhe lungs, the person’s own skin can be seen by the person’s own immune system as an invader ( a bad germ lets say ) and the immune system goes after it and attacks it causing it harm, or killing it. So basically ones own immune system goes crazy decides to attack the kidneys and can kill them
      Often in an effort to stop this from happening a lupus patient is treated with steriods and immuno-suppressant drugs which help to weaken the immune system so that it can’t attack the person’s own organs or blood, but by weakening the immune system it leaves the patient more vunerable to other illnesses and the pt is less able to fight off common viruses and bacteria.

  3. Kay

    Something is wrong with my skin. Esp on my face and left hand.?
    There seems to be rash/pimple-like breakouts on my face and left hand. On my face, it is in 2 places only. It is red and looks like rash. On my left hand, it is spread over my fingers and arm and it looks like pimples, but it is not. It all itches and on my hands, it is spreading and breaking out more. I don’t know what it is.

    1. Lady Rose

      If you’re seriously worried about the rash and itchiness, consult with your doctor, and do not rely solely on people’s answers on Yahoo Answers or any other sites.

      With that being said, it’s possible you have some type of dermatitis. It has many causes and occurs in many forms, including contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis. Dermatitis isn’t life-threatening or contagious, but it can be uncomfortable or even painful.

      It might also be a possibility that you have had a flare-up of eczema or psoriasis. Have you ever had these rashes before?

      Another possibility is you’ve had an allergic reaction to a specific allergen; (food, topical, environmental)

      There is also the possibility that these two rashes are not actually related.
      There are several reasons why a person might have facial redness. Here are just a FEW possibilities:
      – genetics / heredity / hormones
      – medication induced
      – lupus
      – rosacea
      – hyperpyrexia

      Without knowing what is actually causing your rashes, I would hesitate to recommend any treatments. It’s always easier and safest to treat something when you actually know what it is you’re dealing with.

      Please consult your doctor, your health care provider, or a certified dermatologist.

    1. dido

      Michael Jackson was diagnosed in 1986 with vitiligo and lupus; the latter was potentially lethal but was in remission in Jackson’s case. In a 90-minute interview with Oprah Winfrey in February 1993, Jackson dismissed suggestions that he bleached his skin, admitting for the first time that he had the illness. The admission went on to promote awareness of vitiligo, a relatively unknown condition before then.

      Vitiligo (also called “leukoderma”) is a common skin disease in which there is loss of pigment from areas of the skin resulting in irregular white spots or patches. The skin has normal texture. Vitiligo may appear at any age. Although it is a progressive condition, many people experience years or decades without developing new spots.

      Vitiligo is not contagious in any way. The precise cause of Vitiligo is not well-understood, though researchers are getting closer to knowing more. Many experts believe that vitiligo is the result of one or a combination of genetic, immunologic, biochemical and neurogenic factors. Susceptibility to vitiligo may be genetic. It is often, though not always, seen in families. It is thought by many experts that Vitiligo is an autoimmune related disorder, meaning a condition in which the body’s immune system attacks on its own tissue or cells, in this case, the melanocytes (pigment cells which give the skin its color). This does not necessarily represent a weak or deficient immune system, but one which may be malfunctioning or misdirected. Other research has centered on vitamin deficiencies, and internal pathogens. Though the condition has no other known effects on the body, the psychological and social effects are well documented.

      Vitiligo is more noticeable in darker skinned people because of the contrast, although when they tan, even lighter skinned people are affected. This condition affects about .05%-1% of the world population. In some countries, the incidence is even higher. Worldwide, there are thought to be more than 100 million people with the condition. Vitiligo appears to be as old as the recorded history of man – it is mentioned in the Bible, and there are references to it in ancient Egyptian, Greek and Chinese writings.

      Today, vitiligo is a treatable condition, though treatment can take two years or longer to regain pigment, though repigmentation may not be 100%. There is more research being conducted than ever before; in Europe, in Asia, and in the U.S., new technologies and research are changing physicians’ approaches to the condition. The recent mapping of the human genome has paved the way for advanced genetic research into vitiligo, and other cell-based theories are also gaining attention.

      Many experts believe that with genetic and biomedical technology improving as they are, that within the next few years, we will see a greater understanding of vitiligo, as well as faster and more reliable treatments for this, and other autoimmune conditions.

    1. ♥ WitchyWoman ♥

      I have Lupus – specifically SLE Lupus. I was diagnosed when I was 17. It can be fatal, but not always.

      Its an autoimmune disease….

      Common Symptoms of Lupus

      Painful or swollen joints and muscle pain
      Unexplained fever
      Red rashes, most commonly on the face
      Chest pain upon deep breathing
      Unusual loss of hair
      Pale or purple fingers or toes from cold or stress (Raynaud’s phenomenon)
      Sensitivity to the sun
      Swelling (edema) in legs or around eyes
      Mouth ulcers
      Swollen glands
      Extreme fatigue

      Symptoms of lupus can range from mild to severe and may come and go over time. Other symptoms of lupus include chest pain, hair loss, anemia (a decrease in red blood cells), mouth ulcers, and pale or purple fingers and toes from cold and stress. Some people also experience headaches, dizziness, depression, confusion, or seizures. New symptoms may continue to appear years after the initial diagnosis, and different symptoms can occur at different times. In some people with lupus, only one system of the body, such as the skin or joints, is affected. Other people experience symptoms in many parts of their body. Just how seriously a body system is affected varies from person to person.

  4. ilessthanthree.youu

    can you survive lupus?
    i was wondering exactly what lupus was… and if it is something that eventually kills you.. or causes a simple illness to kill you.
    explain please.
    :]

    1. Jeanette M

      What Is Lupus?

      Lupus (pronounced: loo-pus) is a disease that involves the immune system and affects about 1.5 million Americans; nearly 90% of those diagnosed with the disease are female. Normally, a person’s immune system works by producing immunity cells and antibodies, special substances that fight germs and infections. But when a person has lupus, his or her immune system goes into overdrive and can’t tell the difference between some of the body’s normal, healthy cells and germs that can cause infection. So the immune system responds by making autoantibodies that attack the body’s normal cells.

      There are three types of lupus:

      Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (pronounced: er-uh-thee-muh-toe-sus)
      Also called SLE, this is the type of lupus that most people mean when they talk about the disease. It was given its name by a 19th century French doctor who thought that the facial rash of some people with lupus looked like the bite or scratch of a wolf (“lupus” is Latin for wolf and “erythematosus” is Latin for red).

      SLE is the most serious form of lupus. Like Chantelle, about 15% of the people who have SLE first start to feel sick when they are teens. SLE can affect the skin, joints, and tendons. It may also affect organs like the brain, heart, lungs, and kidneys.
      Discoid (pronounced: dis-koyd) Lupus

      This type of lupus is a skin disease that causes a rash on the face, neck, scalp, and ears. It is a much more rare form of lupus than SLE, although about 10% of people with discoid lupus will develop a mild form of SLE. It doesn’t affect other body organs the way that SLE can. The rash of discoid lupus can cause scarring, though.
      Drug-Induced Lupus

      This type of lupus is caused by a reaction to certain kinds of medicines. For example, some types of antiseizure medicines and acne medicines can cause this kind of lupus in teens. Drug-induced lupus is similar to SLE in the ways it affects the body, but once a person stops taking the medicine, the symptoms usually go away.
      What Causes Lupus?

      No one really knows what causes lupus. Researchers think that some people may be more likely to get it due to things that are out of their control, like:

      * gender. Many more women get lupus than men; there are 10 women to every one man with lupus.
      * estrogen. This female hormone may be a factor in lupus – almost all women who get lupus are of childbearing age.
      * race/ethnicity. Lupus occurs more often in African-American, Asian-American, Latin-American, and Native-American women than in non-Hispanic Caucasian women.
      * family history/genetics. About 10% of people with lupus have a family member with lupus.
      * major stress or infection. If people have the genetic tendency to get lupus, extreme stress or an infection may trigger the disease – but the blueprint for lupus has to already be there. One thing researchers know about lupus is that it is not contagious. You can’t catch any of the three types of lupus from another person. And although lupus involves the immune system, it is not the same as other diseases that involve the immune system, like AIDS.

      What Are the Symptoms of Lupus and How Is It Diagnosed?

      Lupus can be hard to diagnose because its symptoms can vary from one person to the next. The symptoms can also make lupus look like certain other diseases. For example, like Chantelle, people with lupus may feel weak and fatigued. They may have muscle aches, loss of appetite, swollen glands, and hair loss. Sometimes they have abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting.

      If a doctor thinks that a patient might have lupus, the doctor may perform certain blood tests. If lupus is suspected, the doctor will probably send the person to a rheumatologist (pronounced: roo-muh-tah-luh-jist). Rheumatologists are doctors who have special training in diagnosing and treating autoimmune diseases like lupus.

      Because signs and symptoms of SLE can be so varied, there are 11 specific signs a rheumatologist will also look for:

      * malar rash. A malar (pronounced: may-lur) rash appears across the nose and cheeks in the shape of a butterfly.
      * discoid rash. This rash features round, red, scaly patches that can appear on the face, arms, scalp, or ears.
      * photosensitivity. This means sensitivity to ultraviolet rays, like the ones that come from the sun or from fluorescent lights. Most people with SLE are photosensitive and find that the sun worsens their lupus.
      * ulcers in the nose or mouth. These usually don’t hurt and many people with SLE don’t even know they are there.
      * arthritis. This makes joints hurt, especially in hands and feet. Unlike the kind of arthritis that older people sometimes get, this arthritis doesn’t damage the bones. Most people with SLE have some degree of arthritis.
      * serositis (pronounced: sir-o-syte-us). This is the collection of fluid near the linings covering the heart, lungs, or abdomen.
      * kidney problems. These can be mild or severe. Most people with SLE will have kidney problems, but only about half of them will have permanent kidney damage.
      * neurologic problems. This refers to problems with the brain and nervous system, like seizures.
      * blood problems. SLE can cause a lower than normal number of red blood cells (anemia), white blood cells, or platelets.
      * immune system problems. Blood tests may show that the immune system isn’t functioning properly.
      * positive ANA test. This is a blood test that shows a certain type of antibody. About 95% of people with SLE have a positive ANA test.

      If a person has four or more of these signs or symptoms, it is likely that he or she has SLE. Most patients don’t develop all 11 of them.

  5. that_photo_chick07

    What can I do about a rash?
    I’ve got an annoying rash around my kneck and on the inside of my right elbow. A few weeks ago I had my nails done so I can’t scratch like I normally could when it would start to itch. The rash is maybe a week old (at most) and I can’t remember changing laundry detergent. I had to take off the necklace my boyfriend got me for my birthday (back the first week in April) because it was bothering the rash… any advice?

    1. Ali

      Rash 101 – Introduction to Common Skin Rashes
      Medical Author: Alan Rockoff, MD
      Medical Editor: Frederick Hecht, MD
      The word “rash” means an outbreak of red bumps on the body. The way people use this term, “a rash” can refer to many different skin conditions. The most common of these are:

      Scaly patches of skin not caused by infection.
      Scaly patches of skin produced by fungus or bacterial infection.
      Red, itchy bumps or patches all over the place.
      Although rashes are seldom dangerous, self-diagnosis is not usually a good idea. Proper evaluation of a skin rash requires a visit to a doctor or other healthcare professional. The following guidelines may help you decide what category your rash falls into.

      Related rash articles:
      Rash – on WebMD

      Can Soaps & Detergents Cause a Rash?
      Medical Author: Alan Rockoff, MD
      Medical Editor: Frederick Hecht, MD, F.A.A.P.

      For years, patients have been coming to my office with eczema, complaining that they had changed their soaps and detergents but their rashes had not gone away.

      The first thing I always tell them is: “Contrary to what you’ve heard, eczema is rarely, if ever, caused by soaps and detergents.”

      I say this because it fits with my experience. People get rashes when they haven’t used anything different, and they don’t become consistently better if they keep shifting products in a futile effort to locate the culprit in the laundry.

      And now — at last! — there is published scientific evidence to back up my experience.

      Is soap to blame for allergic contact dermatitis? »

      Top Searched Rash Terms:
      heat rash, diaper rash, poison oak, Lyme disease, hives, scabies, lupus rash, chicken pox, roseola rash, shingles rash

      Scaly patches of skin not caused by infection

      Scaly, itchy skin patches usually represent one of the conditions referred to as eczema.

      Atopic dermatitis: Atopic dermatitis is perhaps the most common form of eczema. This is an hereditary skin problem that often begins in childhood as chapped cheeks and scaly patches on the scalp, arms, legs, and torso. Later in childhood atopic dermatitis may affect the inner aspects of the elbows and knees. Adults get atopic dermatitis on the hands, around the eyelids, on the genitals, as well as on the body as a whole.

      The word “dermatitis” means inflammation of the skin. “Atopic” refers to diseases that are hereditary, tend to run in families, and often occur together. These diseases include asthma, hay fever, and atopic dermatitis. In atopic dermatitis, the skin becomes extremely itchy and inflamed, causing redness, swelling, cracking, weeping, crusting, and scaling.

      Atopic dermatitis comes and goes, often for no obvious reason. It is often worse in the winter months, when the air is cold and dry, however, moisturizing alone does not help much.

      Patients with atopic dermatitis may have allergies, but most cases of atopic dermatitis are not themselves allergic. In general foods, soaps, and detergents do not play a meaningful role in producing this condition.

      Atopic dermatitis is not contagious, even though patches may appear on various parts of the body. For more information, please read the Atopic Dermatitis article.

      Contact dermatitis: Contact dermatitis is an often-misused term which refers to a rash brought on by contact with a specific material which causes allergy on the skin. Common examples are poison ivy and reactions to costume jewelry containing nickel. Contact dermatitis affects just those parts of the skin touched by whatever material causes the allergy.

      Treatment of contact dermatitis involves avoiding a specific cause, if there is one. Most contact dermatitis is not allergic, however, and therefore can be treated but not prevented. Effective topical (external) include topical steroids, including over-the-counter 1% hydrocortisone and many prescription-strength creams, as well as the newer nonsteroidal medications tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidil).

      There are of course many other scaly rashes. Two worth mentioning are psoriasis, an hereditary condition affecting elbows, knees, and elsewhere, and pityriasis rosea, which produces scaly patches on the chest and back and generally disappears in about a month. Xerosis, very dry skin, may also appear as a rash during the cold, dry months of the year.

      Scaly patches of skin produced by fungus or bacterial infection

      When infections appear as rashes, the most common culprits are funguses or bacterial infections.

      Fungal infections: Fungal infections are fairly common but don’t appear nearly as often as rashes in the eczema category. Perhaps the most common diagnostic mistake made by both patients and non-dermatology physicians is to call scaly rashes “a fungus.” For instance, someone with several scaly spots on the arms, legs, or torso is much more likely to have a form of eczema or dermatitis than actual “ringworm” (the layman’s term for fungus.)

      Fungal infections have nothing to do with hygiene — clean people get them too. Despite their reputation, fungal rashes are not commonly caught from dogs or other animals, nor are they easily transmitted in gyms, showers, pools, or locker rooms. In most cases they are not highly contagious between people either.

      Treatment is usually straightforward. Many effective antifungal creams can be bought that the drug store without a prescription, including clotrimazole 1% and terbinafine 1%.

      Bacterial infections: The most common bacterial infection of the skin is impetigo. Impetigo is caused by staph or strep germs and is much more common in children than adults. Again, poor hygiene plays little or no role. Nonprescription antibacterial creams like bacitracin or Neosporin are not very effective. Oral antibiotics or prescription-strength creams like Bactroban are usually needed. For more, please read the Impetigo article.

      Red, itchy bumps or patches all over the place.

      Outbreaks of this sort are usually either viral or allergic.

      Viral rash: While viral infections of the skin itself, like herpes or shingles (a cousin of chickenpox), are mostly localized to one part of the body, viral rashes are more often symmetrical and everywhere. Patients with such rashes may or may not have other viral symptoms like coughing, sneezing or an stomach upset (nausea). Viral rashes usually last a few days to a week and go way on their own.

      Allergic drug rash: Most allergic drug rashes start within two weeks of taking a new medication, especially if the person has taken the drug before. It is very unlikely for medicine that has been prescribed for months or years to cause an allergic reaction. Because there is usually no specific test to prove whether a rash is allergic, doctors may recommend stopping a suspected drug to see what happens. If the rash doesn’t disappear within five days of not taking the medication, allergy is unlikely.

      Although foods, soaps, and detergents are often blamed for widespread rashes, they are rarely the culprit.

      Other rashes

      Hives (urticaria) are itchy, red welts that come and go on various parts of the body. Most hives are not allergic, run their course, and disappear as mysteriously as they came.

      Because the term is vague, some people use “rash” to describe pimply outbreaks of acne or rosacea on the face.

      What should you do if you have a rash?

      Most rashes are not dangerous to a person or people in the vicinity (unless they are part of an infectious disease such as chickenpox). Many rashes last a while and get better on their own. It is therefore not unreasonable to treat symptoms like itchy and/or dry skin for a few days to see whether the condition gets milder and goes away.

      Nonprescription (over-the-counter) remedies include:

      Anti-itch creams containing camphor, menthol, pramoxine, or diphenhydramine
      Antihistamines like diphenhydramine, chlortrimeton, or loratadine
      Moisturizing lotions

      If these measures do not help, or if the rash persists or becomes more widespread, a visit to a general physician or dermatologist is advisable.
      There are many, many other types of rashes that we have not covered in this article. So it is doubly important, if you have any questions about the cause or treatment of a rash to contact your doctor. This article is really just as the title indicates: “Rash 101 – Introduction to Common Skin Rashes.”

      A word on smallpox vaccination in patients with rashes

      People with atopic dermatitis or eczema should not be vaccinated against smallpox, whether or not the condition is active. In the case of other rashes, the risk of complications is much less. Consult your doctor about the smallpox vaccine.

  6. M Elyas K

    Can someone answer this SLE (Lupus) related question
    Hello My name is Mohammad Elyas and i have just lost my younger sister age 18 last month due to LUPUS her was Kidnet, Lungs and heart involvment. Now as i have already lost someone so dear to this disease i want no more such cases as i have an 3 year old daughter and my wife being pregnant again what are the chances for these babies getting Lupus or any other infection like it also my sister was very close to my daughter she was identified as lupus last year and still she use to play, Kiss and hold my daughter even sleep together so can anly one suggest what can we do to aviode my babies from these disease. Thank you.

    1. Dr. Maddog

      Alopecia areata is a condition affecting humans, in which hair is lost from areas of the body, usually from the scalp. Because it causes bald spots on the scalp, especially in the first stages, it is sometimes called spot baldness. In 1%–2% of cases, the condition can spread to the entire scalp (Alopecia totalis) or to the entire epidermis (Alopecia universalis). Conditions resembling AA, and having a similar cause, occur also in other species. Alopecia areata is not contagious. It occurs more frequently in people who have affected family members, suggesting that heredity may be a factor. In addition, it is slightly more likely to occur in people who have relatives with autoimmune diseases.

      The condition is thought to be an autoimmune disorder in which the body attacks its own hair follicles and suppresses or stops hair growth. There is evidence that T cell lymphocytes cluster around these follicles, causing inflammation and subsequent hair loss. An unknown environmental trigger such as emotional stress or a pathogen is thought to combine with hereditary factors to cause the condition. There are a few recorded cases of babies being born with congenital alopecia areata; however, these are not cases of autoimmune disease because an infant is born without a fully developed immune system.

      As with most autoimmune diseases, alopecia areata is associated with increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases, specifically systemic lupus erythematosus or SLE.

      About 50% of patients’ hair will regrow in one year without any treatment. If the affected region is small, it is reasonable to observe the progression of the illness as the problem often spontaneously regresses and the hair grows back. In 90% of cases, the hair will, ultimately, grow back. In the other 10%, only some or no hair will regrow.

      In cases where there is severe hair loss, there has been limited success treating alopecia areata with clobetasol or fluocinonide, steroid injections, or cream. Steroid injections are commonly used in sites where there are small areas of hair loss on the head or especially where eyebrow hair has been lost. Some other medications used are minoxidil, irritants (anthralin or topical coal tar), and topical immunotherapy cyclosporine, each of which are sometimes used in different combinations.

      Oral corticosteroids decrease the hair loss, but only for the period during which they are taken, and these drugs have adverse side effects.

      Initial stages may be kept from increasing by applying topical corticosteroids. However, topical corticosteroids frequently fail to enter the skin deeply enough to affect the hair bulbs, which are the treatment target

      In most cases that begin with a small number of patches of hair loss, hair grows back after a few months to a year. In cases with a greater number of patches, hair can either grow back or progress to alopecia totalis or, in rare cases, universalis.

      Effects of alopecia areata are mainly psychological (loss of self image due to hair loss). However, patients also tend to have a slightly higher incidence of asthma, allergies, atopic dermal ailments, and even hypothyroidism. Loss of hair also means that the scalp burns more easily in the sun. Loss of nasal hair increases severity of hay fever and similar allergic conditions. Patients may also have aberrant nail formation because keratin forms both hair and nails.

      Episodes of alopecia areata before puberty predispose chronic recurrence of the condition. Pitting of the fingernails can hint at a more severe or prolonged course.

      Hair may grow back and then fall out again later

    1. crimsonshedemon

      Lupus is not contagious.

      Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease that can damage any part of the body (skin, joints, and/or organs inside the body).
      Chronic means that the signs and symptoms tend to last longer than six weeks and often for many years.

      In lupus, something goes wrong with your immune system, which is the part of the body that fights off viruses, bacteria, and germs (“foreign invaders,” like the flu). Normally our immune system produces proteins called antibodies that protect the body from these invaders. Autoimmune means your immune system cannot tell the difference between these foreign invaders and your body’s healthy tissues (“auto” means “self”) and creates autoantibodies that attack and destroy healthy tissue. These autoantibodies cause inflammation, pain, and damage in various parts of the body.

      Lupus tends to run in families but that’s not a rule. Diagnosing lupus is a combination of blood work and symptoms.

  7. Mii Mii

    My cheeks get prickly, hot, and red! Unknown Cause?
    Recently, I have been getting this skin condition more and more often, perhaps once a week. I can’t find the cause of it. It is not itchy or burning, but just feels very hot and red on my cheeks, and is very embarassing under the light. I have very nice pale skin, but when this happens, I do not want to see anyone. I do, however, have a friend that has a red facial skin condition everyday. It looks like her cheeks and nose are very red, with bumps here and there. Could this be a contagious skin disease? She says that she can’t do anything to get rid of it, and that her father has it as well…

    Can someone inform me of the different skin diseases outthere and which ones are contagious?

    I’m really scared because I heard many skin conditions such as rosacea are uncurable…and I’ve always took pride in nice skin…

    Please help!!!! I am desperate =[
    btw…my friend recently started using alot of my foundations, brushes and moisturizers =X

    thanks!

    1. Vixen

      If it looks like a butterfly rash, and it sounds like it might be, get it checked pronto. You need to rule out lupus or another autoimmune disease. If that is not it, you possibly have an allergy to something (milk? wheat? corn? soy? airborne?)

      You didn’t say how old you are? Rule out shingles if you’re over 40. Of course, at that age it could be hot flashes, too.

      Sounds like you’re friend has rosacea, but not you if it comes and goes. Go get it checked for any kind of autoimmune disorder or allergies. If those come out okay, really, a dermatologist (or a hormone doctor) would be much better to ask than us!

      EDIT: As soon as I posted I saw your additional detail. She’s using your make-up which could very well mean cross contamination. Throw those away and proceed to ask the doctors. Never share makeup! If she has rosacea, it is not contagious. She must have something else. BTW, rule out MRSA too. It starts out just like you mentioned.

      Use alternately Witch Hazel and Desitin on your face (Desitin when not in public–yeah, it’s diaper cream but it works) until you get this resolved.

  8. poobear

    Does anyone out there know anyone with Lupus?
    My Mom has been diagnosed with Lupus 10 years ago and I have seen her go through many horrible symptoms. Her lupus has caused her to have diabetese & hypo thyroid desiese. The scariest of these sympyoms are her parinoia. She has now turned on me, thinking that I am capable of all kinds of horrible things. She is trying to poison my kids against me & my husband. She has caused me great disstress & heartache. Should I cut off all ties with her from me & my kids. Please understand that this has gone on for some time now & I’m just tired. The Docs had her on Halodol before, but she doesnt want to be labled as paranoid so she quit taking those meds. Any helpful advice needed.

    1. bubba1pup

      Lupus doesn’t cause all those symptoms.
      Lupus is where the body attacks it’s self and you have organ problems like kidney disease and organ infections and skin problems and you can’t go out in the sun without being covered.
      Lupus is a non contagious, chronic inflammatory condition with reddened skin patches, lupus cause the body to make auto antibodies which attack the skin and other organs.
      Sounds like your mum has something else not lupus, take her to a different doctor.

  9. Mort de rire

    What are the symptoms of lupus?
    My cousin is wondering about lupus (Because Mercedes from America’s Next Top Model had it) and she wanted me to ask people what exactly it is and what the symptoms are. She doesn’t trust Wikipedia and I don’t either. Plus, the web sites usually talk in medical language. So she would like to know (In normal talk)… what is lupus and what are the symptoms?

    1. blondeone

      There are different types of Lupus and each person is going to have different symptoms. My symptoms when I have a flare is like having the flu. I am achy, low grade fever. My joints are swollen and I am so tired I can not get out of bed. I have migraines quite a bit.

      Lupus is an autoimmune disorder. Meaning your immune system is attacking your own body. Joints, cells, skin and organs. You will have flares (the symptoms get worse, you feel very ill) then it goes into a remission (the symptoms appear to go away and you feel a lot better). Lupus is not contagious, it does not go away. There is no cure for Lupus however it is not near as life threatening as it once was. Finding a good rheumatologist is the biggest thing.

    1. Shelty K

      Lupus (pronounced: loo-pus) is a disease that involves the immune system and affects about 1.5 million Americans; nearly 90% of those diagnosed with the disease are female. Normally, a person’s immune system works by producing immunity cells and antibodies, special substances that fight germs and infections. But when a person has lupus, his or her immune system goes into overdrive and can’t tell the difference between some of the body’s normal, healthy cells and germs that can cause infection. So the immune system responds by making autoantibodies that attack the body’s normal cells.

      There are three types of lupus:

      Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (pronounced: er-uh-thee-muh-toe-sus)
      Also called SLE, this is the type of lupus that most people mean when they talk about the disease. It was given its name by a 19th century French doctor who thought that the facial rash of some people with lupus looked like the bite or scratch of a wolf (“lupus” is Latin for wolf and “erythematosus” is Latin for red).

      SLE is the most serious form of lupus. Like Chantelle, about 15% of the people who have SLE first start to feel sick when they are teens. SLE can affect the skin, joints, and tendons. It may also affect organs like the brain, heart, lungs, and kidneys.
      Discoid (pronounced: dis-koyd) Lupus

      This type of lupus is a skin disease that causes a rash on the face, neck, scalp, and ears. It is a much more rare form of lupus than SLE, although about 10% of people with discoid lupus will develop a mild form of SLE. It doesn’t affect other body organs the way that SLE can. The rash of discoid lupus can cause scarring, though.
      Drug-Induced Lupus

      This type of lupus is caused by a reaction to certain kinds of medicines. For example, some types of antiseizure medicines and acne medicines can cause this kind of lupus in teens. Drug-induced lupus is similar to SLE in the ways it affects the body, but once a person stops taking the medicine, the symptoms usually go away.
      What Causes Lupus?

      No one really knows what causes lupus. Researchers think that some people may be more likely to get it due to things that are out of their control, like:

      * gender. Many more women get lupus than men; there are 10 women to every one man with lupus.
      * estrogen. This female hormone may be a factor in lupus – almost all women who get lupus are of childbearing age.
      * race/ethnicity. Lupus occurs more often in African-American, Asian-American, Latin-American, and Native-American women than in non-Hispanic Caucasian women.
      * family history/genetics. About 10% of people with lupus have a family member with lupus.
      * major stress or infection. If people have the genetic tendency to get lupus, extreme stress or an infection may trigger the disease – but the blueprint for lupus has to already be there. One thing researchers know about lupus is that it is not contagious. You can’t catch any of the three types of lupus from another person. And although lupus involves the immune system, it is not the same as other diseases that involve the immune system,

  10. xoxo_peridot05_xoxo

    Can my dog get lupus disease if he was near a dog who had it? …is it contagious?
    i was walking my dog (spaniel) and we saw this dog coming towards us who had lupus…i didnt want to be rude to the owner so i let them sniff each other…will my dog get affected???
    PLS!!! help
    FYI to ppl who said how can i detect if the dog had lupus….

    THE owner told me and you can see his face was hairless….

    1. Yogi and Me

      i think that’s genetic not a contagious disease. You can’t get Lupus from someone who have them either.
      here’s the definition from Mayo clinic
      Lupus is a chronic inflammatory disease that occurs when your body’s immune system attacks your own tissues and organs. Inflammation caused by lupus can affect many different body systems, including your joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, heart and lungs.

      Lupus occurs more frequently in women than it does in men, though it isn’t clear why. Four types of lupus exist — systemic lupus erythematosus, discoid lupus erythematosus, drug-induced lupus erythematosus and neonatal lupus. Of these, systemic lupus erythematosus is the most common and serious form of lupus.

      The outlook for people with lupus was once grim, but diagnosis and treatment of lupus has improved considerably. With treatment, most people with lupus can lead active lives.

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